Author Archives: Matthew

Bone Broth, Gelatine, Oxalate, and Kidney Stones

Bone broth, also known as stock, is recently back in fashion with many purported health benefits. I will admit my own bias in being rather a fan of some good bone broth and suspect it is a beneficial component of … Continue reading

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Victorian Flour Sourdough Bread

Victorian flour sourdough bread – first attempt. My previous experiments with sourdough bread sparked my interest in what other old varieties of wheat flour were available to try. Particularly those originating from, and grown in, the British Isles. It seems curious … Continue reading

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Evidence of decreasing mineral density in wheat grain over the last 160 years

The wheat that we eat today has changed a great deal over the past century. The “Green Revolution“, the breeding of semi-dwarf, higher-yielding cultivars of wheat, and other cereal crops, has led to greatly increased grain production and crop yields since … Continue reading

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Minty Pea Purée on Sourdough Toast

Pea purée on buttered wholemeal spelt sourdough bread. Few foods can match the vivid green of puréed frozen peas. The fresh taste of the peas combines beautifully with the mint an lemon to produce a very green flavour. Gena Hamshaw of … Continue reading

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Adventures in sourdough bread.

Wholemeal spelt sourdough bread with oxtail stew. I have never baked my own bread. This is despite having had a go at cooking many different things over the years and so recently I decided to rectify this omission. Given that … Continue reading

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The origins of semi-dwarf wheat

John Linnell, Wheat (1860) The late summer landscape of 19th Century England, such as painted by John Linnell, was filled with fields of tall golden wheat ripening in the sun. Across the Atlantic the prairies of the midwest states inspired the words … Continue reading

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Bourbon, Brandy and Armagnac: Phenolics and antioxidant capacity

In a recent post I looked into the science behind the phenolic compounds found in my favorite Scottish malt whiskies, and extracted into said water of life via the action of alcohol and water on the wood of the oak barrels … Continue reading

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Oat Avenanthramides

Oats are one of the quintessential foods of the traditional Scottish diet. In terms of health benefits they are best known for their fibre content, particularly their beta-glucan content. Less well known is that this humble grain contains a unique class of … Continue reading

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Whisky polyphenols and their potential health effects

Scapa, one of my current Scottish whiskies Scottish malt whisky, unlike other beverages such as red wine, tea or coffee, has received little attention with regards to its phenolic plant phytochemicals. In the production of malt whisky the pure distilled … Continue reading

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Experimental mead making: Wild fermentations

I have wanted to try brewing something for sometime, and as both mead and honey are particular interests of mine, mead seemed the obvious thing to try for myself. However, the usual methods employed to brew mead at home require at … Continue reading

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